Vitra

New York,  NY 
United States
http://www.vitra.com
  • Booth: 3502

Creating innovative products and concepts with great design talent is Vitra's essence. These are developed in Switzerland and globally specified to create inspirational environments for working, living, shopping and public spaces. www.vitra.com


 Press Releases

  • The Vitra Accessories Collection encompasses the growing portfolio of design objects, accessories and textiles produced by the Swiss furniture company. The collection is based on classic patterns and objects conceived by designers such as Alexander Girard, George Nelson and Charles and Ray Eames. In addition to these classics, it also includes pieces by contemporary designers. Authenticity, joy and playfulness are hallmarks of the Vitra Accessories Collection. For the autumn / winter collection of 2018, Vitra will expand its accessories portfolio with design objects by Charles and Ray Eames, Alexander Girard, Arik Levy and Front. Vitra is introducing the following new products:

    Resting Animals, Front (2018)

    Resting Animals are the result of a recent research project by Front focusing on the close connection between humans and figurative objects. The design duo asked randomly selected people to identify the most emotionally enriching and meaningful objects in their lives. The majority of answers turned out to be animal figures that were perceived to have personalities, specific attributes or a shared history. Previous works by Front have been devoted to the systematic observation of how various animals sleep or hibernate. This interest is now expressed in a group of slumbering creatures – Resting Animals – whose poses exude a serene tranquility. The largest is a knit-covered bear that can be used as a stool, ottoman or backrest, for example. The smaller designs are decorative ceramic figures depicting a cat and two birds in different sizes. Resting Animals not only bring a touch of nature into the home; their peaceful presence goes beyond the visual to communicate a sense of contentment and companionship.

    Eames Radio, Charles & Ray Eames (1946)

    After developing a successful method for molding plywood in the early 1940s, Charles and Ray Eames employed the acquired know-how to create a wide range of products – including radio cabinets. By 1952, roughly 200,000 radios designed by the Eameses had been sold by various manufacturers. One design, however, never went into production: an elegant table radio with a molded plywood case, whose compact shape and austere, more technical look were unusual for the time. Conceived in 1946, the radio was rejected by the designated manufacturer, who wanted a 'normal design'. Charles and Ray sent photographs of the prototype to the magazine 'Interiors'; matchbooks were included in the pictures as a scale reference. Their aim was to increase the acceptance of smaller, more modern devices. However, this goal proved elusive, and the production of Eames radios was discontinued in the early 1950s. More than 70 years later, Vitra has joined the Eames Office to revive the design of this compact radio, which was a favourite of Charles and Ray. Encased in an elegant walnut cabinet and equipped with up-to-date technology by the British manufacturer REVO, the Eames Radio today bears witness to the designer couple's unwavering belief in progress. The Eames Radio is available in a limited edition of 999 units.

    Eames House Bird, walnut

    Charles and Ray Eames were keen travelers their entire lives and brought back numerous objects and accessories from their travels to furnish and decorate their private home, the Eames House. One of these items is a black bird figure that has stood in their living room for over fifty years. Highly treasured by the couple, it also appeared as a frequent accessory in photographs taken by Charles and Ray. In collaboration with the Eames Office, Vitra is now issuing a version of the Eames House Bird in dark walnut with a clear lacquer finish. The visible grain gives the wooden bird an authentic and natural look, which also highlights the carefully handcrafted production process.

    Popsicle Clock, George Nelson/Charles Pollock (1957)

    In the 1950s, George Nelson and his office conceived a range of everyday objects in the aim of bringing modern design to American homes. These included an extensive collection of unusual wall clocks. Re-edited by Vitra, this portfolio of wall clocks now welcomes a new addition: the Popsicle Clock. Comprising a structure of flat walnut rods, resembling – as the name suggests – popsicle sticks, and striking metal hands in a white powder-coated finish, this model is a further example of the imaginative vision employed by George Nelson and his team with regard to shapes and materials. Wall Clocks by Vitra are equipped with a high-quality quartz movement, and the extensive portfolio of timepieces includes something to suit almost every taste and fancy.

    Table Runners, Alexander Girard

    Along with his colleagues Charles and Ray Eames and George Nelson, Alexander Girard was one of the leading figures in American design during the postwar era. While textile design was the primary focus of Girard's oeuvre, he was also admired for his work in the graphic arts as well as furniture, exhibition and interior design. Girard brought a sensuous playfulness to twentieth-century design that had been absent from the austere aesthetic of classic modernism. For the Table Runners, Vitra collaborated with the Girard family to select the textile designs Broken Lines and Geometric E, developed by Alexander Girard in 1964 and 1971 respectively.

    Angel Candle Holder, Alexander Girard

    Girard made the Angel Candle Holder himself for his home in Santa Fe, where it stood on the dining table surrounded by folk art and vases. He also used the motif in his graphic designs for the exhibition 'Hemisfair – The Magic of a People', which was held in San Antonio, Texas in 1968. Vitra collaborated with the Girard family to develop the white candle holder for serial production in powder-coated steel.

    Silhouette, Alexander Girard (1965)

    In the 1960s Girard created the interior concepts for several restaurants – La Fonda del Sol (1961, New York), L'Etoile (1966, New York) and Compound (1967, Santa Fe) – with comprehensive solutions ranging from decoration, furniture and tableware to napkins, business cards and matchboxes. In 1965 he was commissioned to design the New York restaurant La Reserve and created a series of charming metal figures that appear to be dancing: Silhouettes. They were to be positioned between the dining tables, adding a cheerful touch to the ambience, while simultaneously serving as attractive partitions between guests. The restaurant La Reserve unfortunately never came into being, but the plans and drawings by Alexander Girard were preserved and are part of the Alexander Girard Collection held by the Vitra Design Museum. Together with the Girard family, Vitra studied all the ideas developed for La Reserve, and decided to bring the Silhouettes to life – initially with the motifs Bull and Mermaid.

    Metal Wall Relief Dove, Alexander Girard (1965)

    The Metal Wall Reliefs are examples of wall decorations developed by Girard for a number of projects. The Metal Wall Reliefs Sun, Arrow, Heart and Little Heart, which were created for The Compound Restaurant and Girard’s own house in Santa Fe, now welcome a new addition to the collection: Metal Wall Relief Dove. The dove of peace first made an appearance in Girard’s work in 1965 and was used repeatedly throughout his creative life and career in a variety of manners – such as for diverse textile applications, on his Tree of Life or in his legendary graphic design work for Braniff Airlines. Selected by Vitra together with the Girard family, the motifs for the Metal Wall Reliefs are manufactured in robust metal.

    Color Update: Toolbox, Arik Levy (2010)

    Toolbox is a practical storage container with a handle for use in the home and office. Designed with functional compartments, it is perfect for organizing all sorts of items, such as accessories, make-up, kitchen utensils, medication, work materials and writing paraphernalia etc. Made of robust plastic, Toolbox is now available in an updated palette of colors. www.vitra.com

  • Alexander Girard (1907-1993) was one of the most influential circles in American design during the post-war period, together with his good friends and colleagues George Nelson and Charles and Ray Eames. Textile design was a major focus of Girard's multi-faceted work; his enthusiasm for bright colors, lively patterns and rich textures found expression in hundreds of designs for upholstery and decorating fabrics.

    Originally trained as an architect, Girard also distinguished himself during his long career as a designer of furniture, graphics, exhibition installations and interiors. Two legendary commissions were the acclaimed interior for La Fonda del Sol restaurant in New York City and his work for Braniff Airlines, which covered the entire spectrum of product design and corporate branding. The classic austerity of twentieth-century design was enriched by the playfulness and sensuality of Girard's work.

    Girard cultivated a deep interest in the folk art of South America, Eastern Europe and Asia, and drew inspiration from traditional handcrafted artifacts for his work. The color palette, patterns and motifs that account for the recognisable distinctiveness of many designs can be traced back to these cultural roots. Girard's immense collection of folk art, which he assembled over several decades, is now the main attraction at the famous Museum of International Folk Art in Santa Fe, New Mexico, where Girard made his home during the later decades of his life.

    The Wooden Dolls, designed and made by Girard in 1963 for his own house in Santa Fe, were also inspired by his collection of folk art. At the same time, they reflect his long-time interest in traditional toys, of which he remarked: "Toys represent a microcosm of man’s world and dreams; they exhibit fantasy, imagination, humor and love. They are an invaluable record and expression of man’s ingenious unsophisticated imagination."

    The painted surfaces of these semi-abstract, sculptural figures show aesthetic elements from Central America as well as Eastern Europe and Italy. Part decorative object and part toy, the Wooden Dolls were originally created for Girard's own use. He also may have planned their distribution through the "Textiles & Objects Shop" in New York City, which he operated for Herman Miller from 1961 to 1963. This mixed group of figures, some cheerful and others stern, is now being introduced in a special edition series based on documents and originals in the Alexander Girard Archive of the Vitra Design Museum. Like the accent pillows covered in fabrics by Girard, they bring a touch of charm to any interior.

    www.vitra.com/woodendolls

 Products

  • Vitra - Wooden Dolls by Alexander Girard
    The Wooden Dolls are a large family of wooden figures representing human and animal characters, originally designed by Alexander Girard for his own home in Santa Fe and inspired by his personal collection of folk art....

  • The Wooden Dolls by Alexander Girard are a large family of wooden figures representing human and animal characters. Girard – one of the leading figures of postwar American design – designed them in 1953 for his own use as decorative objects in his Santa Fe home. These originals, which are part of the Girard estate in the holdings of the Vitra Design Museum, served as models for the current re-editions. Precisely replicated down to the last detail, the many different Wooden Dolls are still fabricated and painted by hand today, just like the vintage pieces by Alexander Girard. And even if the differences between them are only very slight: each wooden figure is a unique, individual product, truly one of a kind. www.vitra.com/woodendolls
  • Vitra - Resting Animals by Front
    The Resting Animals are a group of slumbering creatures whose poses exude a serene tranquility. The largest design – a knit-covered bear – can be used as a stool, ottoman or backrest, while the smaller designs serve more as decorative objects....

  • Resting Animals are the result of a recent research project, in which the design duo Front asked randomly selected people to identify the most emotionally enriching and meaningful objects in their lives. The majority of answers turned out to be animal figures that were perceived to have personalities, specific attributes or a shared history. Previous works by Front have been devoted to the systematic observation of how various animals sleep or hibernate. This interest is now expressed in a group of slumbering creatures – Resting Animals – whose poses exude a serene tranquility. The largest is a knit-covered bear that can be used as a stool, ottoman or backrest, for example. The smaller designs are decorative ceramic figures depicting a cat and two birds in different sizes. Resting Animals not only bring a touch of nature into the home; their peaceful presence goes beyond the visual to communicate a sense of contentment and companionship.
  • Vitra - Popsicle Clock by George Nelson
    The Popsicle Clock, the latest addition to the family of Wall Clocks by George Nelson and Charles Pollock, is composed of flat walnut rods resembling – as the name suggests – popsicle sticks and striking metal hands in a white powder-coated finish....

  • In the 1950s, George Nelson and his office conceived a range of everyday objects with the aim of bringing modern design to American homes. These included an extensive collection of unusual wall clocks. Re-edited by Vitra, this portfolio of wall clocks now welcomes a new addition: the Popsicle Clock. With a structure of flat walnut rods resembling – as the name suggests – popsicle sticks and striking metal hands in a white powder-coated finish, this model is a further example of the imaginative vision employed by George Nelson and his team with regard to shapes and materials. The Wall Clocks by Vitra, available in a diverse range of shapes and materials, are equipped with a high-quality quartz movement and offer a refreshing alternative to conventional timepieces – including a wide selection of different designs to suit almost every taste and fancy. www.vitra.com/wallclocks
  • Vitra - Eames Radio by Charles & Ray Eames
    Conceived in 1946, the design of this elegant table radio with a molded plywood case was unusual for the time and was originally rejected by the designated manufacturer. More than 70 years later, it is now available in a limited edition of 999 units....

  • After developing a successful method for molding plywood in the early 1940s, Charles and Ray Eames employed the acquired know-how to create a wide range of products – including radio cabinets. By 1952, roughly 200,000 radios designed by the Eameses had been sold by various manufacturers. One design, however, never went into production: an elegant table radio with a molded plywood case, whose compact shape and austere, more technical look were unusual for the time. More than 70 years after it was first conceived, Vitra has now joined forces with the Eames Office to revive the design of this compact radio, which was a favorite of Charles and Ray. Encased in an elegant walnut cabinet and equipped with the latest technology by the British manufacturer REVO, the Eames Radio today bears witness to the designer couple's unwavering belief in progress. The Eames Radio is available in a limited edition of 999 units.
  • Vitra - Eames House Bird walnut
    The iconic Eames House Bird is now available in dark walnut with a clear lacquer finish. The visible grain gives the wooden bird an authentic and natural look, which also highlights the carefully handcrafted production process....

  • Charles and Ray Eames were keen travelers their entire lives and brought back numerous objects and accessories from their travels to furnish and decorate their private home, the Eames House. One of these items is a black bird figure that stood in their living room for over fifty years – an artifact of American folk art that was highly treasured by the couple and also appeared fas an accessory in many of their photographs. In collaboration with the Eames Office, Vitra is now issuing a version of the Eames House Bird in dark walnut with a clear lacquer finish. The visible grain gives the wooden bird an authentic and natural look, which also highlights the carefully handcrafted production process. www.vitra.com/eameshousebird
  • Artek - Golden Bell "Savoy" by Alvar Aalto
    True to the original design created by Alvar Aalto for the The Savoy Restaurant in Helsinki in 1937, the new Savoy version of Artek’s “Golden Bell” is crafted from a single piece of brass with an uncoated surface that will age gracefully over time....

  • Nicknamed “Golden Bell,” Pendant Light A330S has a sculptural quality that can be appreciated whether the light is switched on or off. Casting golden reflections, its perforated rim creates a memorable corona effect and prevents glare. The pendant light was created by Alvar Aalto for the interior of The Savoy Restaurant in Helsinki in 1937, whose interior he and Aino were commissioned to design. True to the original design, the new Savoy version of the “Golden Bell” is crafted from a single piece of brass with an uncoated surface that will age gracefully over time. Natural oxidation starts right after production, beginning an aging process that will result in a beautiful patina. Embodying Alvar Aalto’s signature streamlined aesthetic, it provides a light that is both warm-toned and characteristically diffuse. Eighty years later, the elegant Savoy restaurant with a view over Helsinki’s rooftops is still home to the iconic pendants. www.artek.fi/stories/elegance-updated
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